North Devon Pottery and Its Export to America in the 17th Century Part 1

There are some references to the Bretby pottery in specialist publications which are quoted in this book, but they will not be easy to obtain eg The Pottery Gazette of May , pp – , and June , – If you really want to know more about Bretby pottery, then read on Christopher Dresser – was a famous Victorian designer some people argue that he was the first real “designer” who produced designs for many different media jewellery, textiles, metalwork, ceramics, etc. He was engaged as Art Director by the Linthorpe pottery – to design a large proportion of their output. The manager of Linthorpe was Henry Tooth – The Bretby pottery traded as “Tooth and Ault” from – William Ault left the partnership in to set up his own Ault pottery – at Swadlincote, Derbyshire.

Category Archives: Ceramics

Grace’s Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains , pages of information and , images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them. Barnstaple Thomas Backway Brannam started business on his own, after having worked for some years as a potter, in Barnstaple, Devon Thomas took over the lease to the North Walk premises the handbill still shows the spelling “Brannan”.

Thomas became particularly successful in the production of sgraffito [a] pottery and one of his jugs secured a medal at the Great Exhibition in Most of the products however were country pottery, as well as bricks, sewage pipes and tiles. He had left school having won the Art Prize.

Superb large antique 19th c. creamware/mochaware 3 pattern slip decorated pitcher. aafa offered today is a wonderful and rare antique 19th century staffordshire pitcher rare graphic slip and stamped 40, and of english pitcher bulbous body is decorated 3 different styles/patterns of slip decoration! this is.

Monday, 10 October An Odyssey to Odda’s Chapel and the Priory Church of St Mary, Deerhurst Finding myself at a loose end on the north side of Gloucester for a couple of hours yesterday morning, I took myself nine miles up the road to Deerhurst, somewhere I’ve wanted to visit for some time on account of its brace of Saxon Churches.

Yes, two Saxon churches within spitting distance of each other. Dedicated in , it was incorporated into a 16th or early 17th century farmhouse, its nave being turned into a kitchen and its chancel a bedroom. Like St Laurence’s, the Saxon church in Bradford-on-Avon, it was only in the second half of the 19th century that it was ‘rediscovered’ and separated from the farmhouse, itself an impressive historic building.

My chief presentiment – because I’ve decided you can have a presentiment about the past – was that cows had probably been kept in there at some point. On to the Priory Church of St Mary, which is years older than Odda’s Chapel, its contruction having commenced by at least AD, and possibly during the late 6th century. If what we know of the history of the church is anything to go by, Deerhurst was an important site in the territory of the Saxon Hwicce, a subkingdom of Mercia.

Excavations have uncovered remains of the Saxon monastery, with 7th century burial remains. I was captivated by these very much more modern headstones in the churchyard, a full millennium older. Although tucked away in a village, St Mary’s is an important church and knows it. What’s more, it was full of wedding flowers from the previous day and bustling parishioners arranging homely-looking apples and small, decorative pumpkins ready for the Harvest Festival, which was due to start presently.

I knew I was going to have to be quick

Brannam Pottery

He studied at Lambeth School of Art, and took up his first job at Doulton , Lambeth in the early s. Some time in he moved down to Barnstaple to work at the Brannam Pottery. Baron was a modeller, designer and potter. He continued his studies at Barnstaple School of Art, and after gaining his master’s certificate started to teach pottery himself.

Morgan Williams, Pottery Art, Ceramic Pottery, Ceramic Decor, Modern Pitchers, Ceramic Artists, Design Movements, Arts And Crafts Movement, Blue Colors Find this Pin and more on William De Morgan’s Ceramics by Meral Cetin.

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A superb gold and enamel British Royal Artillery Regimental broach. This military badge features the design of an artillery gun, motto and Kings crown. Reverse side features high quality pin and hook and gold stamping for 15ct gold. These broaches were usually given by serving British army officers to there wife, mother or sweetheart. Plated metal and silver types are fairly common but gold examples are extremely rare, especially in high grade 15ct gold. If you are interested in military items please look at my other site at, www.

A fine quality gold sweetharts badge, miniature British Guards Regiment’s 9ct gold badge mounted on bar broach. Reverse side features pin and hook and it is marked 9ct. These sweat harts badges were given by serving British officers to there wife’s and sweetharts and were especially popular during WW If you are interested in arms and militaria please see our other site, www.

Arts and crafts in Berkshire

This item is not for sale, but you will find many that are in our Brannam jug mark Brannam Pottery Thomas Brannam started on his own, after having worked for some years as a potter, in Barnstaple, Devon, in The company originally made utility wares such as floor tiles and sewage pipes. The name most usually associated with Brannam is that of Charles Hubert Brannam, Thomas’s son, born Charles started work at the pottery at the age of twelve.

AN impressive collection of period pottery made in Barnstaple is going up for auction in Gloucestershire next week. More than items produced by Brannam Pottery are going under the hammer at.

Brannam Pottery Thomas Brannam started on his own, after having worked for some years as a potter, in Barnstaple, Devon, in The company originally made utility wares such as floor tiles and sewage pipes. The name most usually associated with Brannam is that of Charles Hubert Brannam, Thomas’s son, born Charles started work at the pottery at the age of twelve.

He was artistically inclined, and after many years trying, managed to persuade his father, in , to let him experiment with the production of art pottery at their Litchdon Street works. In the following decade a London outlet was found for the wares, which were known as Royal Barum Ware, and the company soon established an enviable reputation. It is true to say that they were patronised by the crowned heads of Europe, and that included Queen Victoria. Fine wares continued to be produced well into the twentieth century, but after C H Brannam’s death in the emphasis moved away from art pottery back towards plainer domestic wares.

Brannam pottery is widely collected and due to the company’s long life – they are still producing pottery today – something can be found to suit every collector’s pocket. Many marks have been used over the years, mostly using combinations of ‘C H Brannam’, ‘Castle’, ‘Barum’ and ‘Barnstaple’.

Did you work at Shapland and Petter or Brannam’s? Barnstaple’s museum needs you

This was their “bread and butter” trade, although one of their decorative jugs secured a medal at the Great Exhibition in In Thomas’s son, Charles Hubert Brannam, left school at age 12 to start work at the pottery. Charles won a prize for art at school and also won the Queen’s Prize for Drawing in

Online Antique Pottery Marks Guide. Pottery marks are the fingerprints of the antique pottery world, and after more than seven years of selling online, we have built up a considerable collection of photos of real pottery marks.

Tile Gazetteer Index The inclusion of a site in the Tile Gazetteer does not guarantee any availability of public access nor that any listed site remains in existence or is unchanged. Devon is a county brim-full of colourful ceramics. This is partly due to its profusion of churches, whose interiors often combine medieval tile pavements with Victorian ceramic decoration. Victorian restoration was responsible for tile pavements being installed at many churches, particularly those rebuilt by the Barnstaple Borough Surveyor Richard Davie Gould during the mid-nineteenth century.

Where development was more intense, for instance at Torquay, much tiling has been lost. A full list of locations of the ceramic plaques installed in as part of the Alphabet of Parishes Project, which celebrated local identity, may be found in the Devon Roundup. Gould in , although it was before the chancel was complete. It was owned by C.

Category Archives: Ceramics

Pots in Punjab, Pakistan Additives can be worked into the clay body prior to forming, to produce desired effects in the fired wares. Coarse additives such as sand and grog fired clay which has been finely ground are sometimes used to give the final product a required texture. Contrasting coloured clays and grogs are sometimes used to produce patterns in the finished wares.

Colourants, usually metal oxides and carbonates, are added singly or in combination to achieve a desired colour. Combustible particles can be mixed with the body or pressed into the surface to produce texture. Named after its resemblance to the quartz mineral agate which has bands or layers of colour that are blended together, agatewares are made by blending clays of differing colours together but not mixing them to the extent that they lose their individual identities.

Pottery stamp to base of each, Sandland Ware, Hanly Stafordshire. All five are in perfect condition and probably date to the ‘s. SET OF SILVER SIFTERS BY ROYAL JEWELER’S GARARDS.

The company originally made utility wares such as floor tiles and sewage pipes. The name most usually associated with Brannam is that of Charles Hubert Brannam, Thomas’s son, born Charles started work at the pottery at the age of twelve. He was artistically inclined, and after many years trying, managed to persuade his father, in , to let him experiment with the production of art pottery at their Litchdon Street works. In the following decade a London outlet was found for the wares, which were known as Royal Barum Ware, and the company soon established an enviable reputation.

It is true to say that they were patronised by the crowned heads of Europe, and that included Queen Victoria. Fine wares continued to be produced well into the twentieth century, but after C H Brannam’s death in the emphasis moved away from art pottery back towards plainer domestic wares. Brannam pottery is widely collected and due to the company’s long life – they still producing pottery untill recently when their factory complex at Rounswell closed – something can be found to suit every collector’s pocket.

Many marks have been used over the years, mostly using combinations of ‘C H Brannam’, ‘Castle’, ‘Barum’ and ‘Barnstaple’.

Dating fired-clay ceramics